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View Poll Results: Which Short Shift assembly do you currently have?
OEM 'Euro' S3 / TT Short shifter 19 38.78%
Forge Motorsports 2 4.08%
VWR 1 2.04%
Ralco RZ 0 0%
VF Engineering 2 4.08%
Autotech 0 0%
HPA 2 4.08%
Neuspeed 4 8.16%
DieselGeek 19 38.78%
TWM Performance 0 0%
Voters: 49. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-27-2013, 10:03 AM   #1
SK VeeDubR
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02M 6-Speed Short Shift and Bushing Options for MKIV, MKV, and MKVI including Golf R

02M 6-Speed Short Shift Options for MKIV, MKV, and MKVI


*Please note this thread is discussing shifter options for the 02M VW 6-speed transmission only (includes MKIV, MKV, MKVI Golf, Jetta, as well as Audi A3/S3/TT and a few others from VAG)

If I had the time and the money I would probably buy every single option and try as many combinations as possible, as I feel one's shift components to be one of the most critical interfaces between machine and driver. Since I probably won't be purchasing every single option anytime soon, I am requesting the imput of forum members to contribute what they can to this thread as a means to help facilitate decisions/discussions, and sharing of ideas. If there is a blank spot and you can fill the answer in, just reply to this thread and I will add it when I can.

I know people will be looking to this thread to get answers – but the reality of the Short Shift (SS) world is you will most likely walk away with more questions. It seems every time a new thread started about ‘which SS should I get?’, or ‘which SS is better?’ people often feel more confused than ever. The reality, barring some flaw in engineering, is that the best SS is what feels best for YOU. The only way to know is to try and get a feel for as many as you can from people who already have a SS. Or buy a SS, and if you don’t like – sell it, share your thoughts, and try again.

I will try to stick to the ‘facts’ and manufacturer claims etc in these original posts. By all means I expect and welcome many varied opinions. This thread is not meant to say X is better than Y, but rather a resource that people can refer to when they wish for clarification between X and Y (and Z, etc)

I will add to the original post as necessary to keep this information as complete as possible as people contribute.

I debated how to present each SS and in what order, I don’t really have a rhyme or reason, other than I will present them in a design variation/evolution approach, with those closer to OEM first.

**This first post will be focusing primarily on the fore-aft, or front-to-back shifter. The side-to-side (or relay lever) will be discussed in post two. And Bushings etc in post three.**

The Short Shift that everyone thinks about (no, I don’t mean shortening your throw using a hacksaw – will not be discussing that here), is commonly the fore-aft, or front-to-back (F2B) lever. This lever affects how long your throws are from 1 to 2, or from 3 to 4 for example.

Modification of this (F2B) lever alone will not affect side-to-side (S2S) distance, however, if there is a good interface between your F2B and your S2S, this may help eliminate slop, or the ‘spoon in mashed potatoes’ effect.



First off, let’s look at a common F2B OEM 6-speed Shifter


This is the common 6-speed shifter which comes standard on GTI’s and GLI’s for example (note this has later square cable end attached)

Cast with zinc coating
PN 1K0 711 048 N?
Cost – debatable, I’m sure there is an OE price, but if you’re looking for a SS this is NOT your answer.
Distance Pin to Fulcrum approx. 6.7cm (not confirmed)





Here we see a nice comparison of an early OEM shifter (like above), and to the right, the newer OEM shifter found on MKVI Ed 35 GTI, MKVI Golf R, Audi S3 / TT-S etc and is commonly referred to as the ‘Euro SS’

Notice the pin position relative to the fulcrum on each – Euro SS is closer by approx 0.7mm

Cast with zinc coating
PN ? 8J0 711 051 E (arm) and 8J0 711 046 E (under Audi logo)
Cost – approx $50 USD
Distance Pin to Fulcrum approx. 6.0cm (not confirmed)
Approximate reduction in throw from regular OEM 6-speed lever 15% - 20%





Here is another look at those OEM shifters we just examined. An easy way to identify which is which is the ‘Euro SS has a hole above the triangle in the casting between the pin and the fulcrum





Next we’ll look at a solution from Forge Motorsports. Originally from what I can gather, Forge simply re-drilled and slotted OEM shifters (presumably from the MKIV) and provided an adjustable pin. (Can’t find a photo of this, I could be wrong). Later, Forge did their own casting (based on OEM), but slightly modified and still with the slot for pin adjustment.

Cast, zinc plated?
Cost – approx $130 USD
Distance range from fulrum to available pin positions (min/max)??
Approximate reduction in throw from regular OEM 6-speed claimed 0% (stock) to 40%

Forge's position is that a counterweight becomes less important the shorter your throw is. Now, in terms of physical design it becomes very difficult to shorten the S2S with a large counterweight. Do they speak the truth, or is it their way of explaining why their counterweight is small compares with some other designs? It is important to note that there are other short shifters for the 02M without a counterweight. Again comes down to personal preference.




Forge vs Euro SS



Similar to Forge, here is VWR’s solution (not sure which came first, but they look awful similar, don’t they!)

Cast, zinc plated?
Cost – $250 USD *note – includes S2S lever and associated hardware
Distance range from fulrum to available pin positions (45mm min/75mm max)
Approximate reduction in throw claimed 25% (compared to Forge, I would like to know the difference as the F2Bs look similar in adjustability. I would assume 25 to 40% reduction range)

Just the F2B from VWR



The VWR ‘kit’



*Do not make the mistake of assuming VWR is VAG’s VW Racing division, they are a tuning company like many others. This is NOT an OEM piece as many might have you try to believe.





Now here is a ripoff if I ever saw one.. Ralco RZ (looks EXACTLY like VWR's offering, only much cheaper)

Cast, zinc plated?
Cost $85
Claimed reduction - up to 40% (so why does VWR only claim 25%?)

if you bought this and the metal OEM relay lever (PN 1J0711202J) and a couple white plastic bushings (1J0711067L x2) you would be much cheaper than the VWR kit..






This is VF Engineering’s latest SS
, not to be confused with VWR (people use these two names interchangeably sometimes, however you can see they are two very different units). VF’s SS does not have a slotted adjustability, but rather it is adjustable by selecting one of two pin locations.

Cast, powdercoated?
Cost - $150 USD
Distance(s) from fulcrum to pin ??
Approximate reduction in throw claimed 22% and 36%





I found this one but never heard of anyone running it.. Autotech for the 02M


Material? finish?
Cost - $80 USD
Distance from pin to fulcrum ?
Claimed reduction in throw 20% from standard 6-speed






Another option is HPA’s 305 version for the 02M
. It too is adjustable via one of two pin positions. Notice the large counterweight. As opposed to a F2B like Forge, having a large counterweight while shortening your throw may retain an OEM quality to the shift as some have said.

Cast, zinc plated (some are powdercoated)
Cost – $150 USD
Distance(s) from fulcrum to pin approx 40mm / 50mm
Approximate reduction in throw claimed 20% and 35/40% (not sure why it is presented like this. Earlier adverts claimed 20% / 35%, casting looks the same)




This one from HPA looks polished
. Not sure if that was done from HPA directly?





Here is Neuspeed’s answer
. What it lacks in adjustability (it has a fixed pin, like OEM) it makes up for in shininess (if that matters to you). Large counterweight but not as large as HPA’s.

Billet Aluminum
Cost - $230 USD
Distance from fulcrum to pin ??
Approximate reduction in throw claimed 40%





Here is a side by side of an OEM piece (can you tell which one?) vs Neuspeed’s SS






Up until now, the options we have seen have been variations on the same idea..


The Sigma 6 SS from DieselGeek
not only reduces your fore-aft, but also your side-to-side. (We will be discussing options for your side-to-side with the above options on the next post, but for the purposes of DG it is difficult to separate the two as they were designed as a unit)

Billet Aluminum
Cost - $195 USD
Distance from fulcrum to pin ??
Approximate reduction in throw ??




Notice the lack of a counterweight in the DG unit





The SS options discussed thus far are the more common ones we see nowadays, but in my searching I came across some others I thought I would share
Here is an option from TWM Performance, does it look familiar? Not sure which came first, but it does look like TWM has shifter options for many makes and models.

Billet Aluminum
Cost - $280 USD (comes with weighted shift knob)
Distance from fulcrum to pin ??
Approximate reduction in throw claimed 30%, no apparent reduction in S2S




With optional shift knob from TWM






Earlier DG Race? Looks to be a combination of billet and stamped steel.










Here are some less common or variations on the above F2Bs


Early Neuspeed with Ball pivot instead of pin (Ball Pivot used up until MY2002 or thereabouts)




How about this for adjustability from ECS Tuning..

Cast shift arm
Cost - $250?
Distance from fulcrum to pin positions?
Claimed three percentages of adjustment (49, 28, 7%) as well as a stock setting. Also, adjustable counterweights.




Anyone running EIPTuning’s version?


I can’t find much info on this kit, other than the pin they use on the F2B might be the older 10mm




Early VF Engineering design.
Hmm, look familiar?? I would say identical cast to another popular version we all know. Can’t find much info on this either.




Here we see two OEM levers from a MKIV
I believe. The pins have been redrilled to different locations on each. You can also see from this image where Forge and VWR got their casting design from – early OEM.




And I just had to share this guy’s ‘design’. (his theory was that by relocating the pin FURTHER from the fulcrum you would, in effect, create a MORE precise, and quick shift as you give the syncros time to do their thing. Also, by grinding down the counterweight the lever could function without the drawback of momentum). Not only did he lengthen his F2B, but he SHORTENED his S2S for a rather, um.. Unique combo? You be the judge.




Hope you have enjoyed, and thanks to those I borrowed pics from! I’ll be slowly updating and revising this as info is presented. And by all means if there is anything else you want to see covered wrt this topic please let me know and I’ll try to include it!
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Old 02-27-2013, 10:10 AM   #2
SK VeeDubR
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02M Relay Lever (side-to-side) options

02M Relay Lever (side-to-side) options


The Relay lever, or Side-to-Side (S2S) lever as some call it, often plays second fiddle to the Front- to – Back (F2B) lever when people consider modifying their shift. Sometimes, people prefer to leave this lever alone as the shorter your side-to-side throw is, the greater the risk of selecting a wrong gear (with potential catastrophic results results).
There are three basic relay lever options for the 02M, and then there are some variants which are part of a larger unit such as found on the DG Sigma 6.


The first option is OEM

This is a metal relay lever found on MkIV’s through to the 2007 MKV
*note cable end is attached
PN 1J0 711 202 J
Stamped Steel
Cost – approx $63 (includes cable end)
Distance from pin to fulcrum ?




**It is important to note that somewhere between 2001/2002 VW switched to a pin-style cable attachment from the previous ball pivot. If you are thinking of upgrading any of your shift components you need to understand what you are trying to achieve, the type of cable attachment(s) you have, the type of cable ends you have, among other things (bushings etc)


Here is a good representation of the interface between a front-back (OEM 6-speed), and Relay lever




Here is an HPA SS with a metal OEM Relay lever



Modified OEM Relay lever (to the right, see how he remounted the pin lower on the lever)



Early DG Race? With OEM stlye metal Relay lever (notice modified slide)



Even earlier DG variant with OEM Relay lever which was modified




Here is Forge’s ‘version’ of the Relay lever. I use the term version loosely as it in actuality is just an OEM relay lever with the pin ground off, a track slotted in, and then supplied with an adjustable pin (similar to their fore-aft SS)

Stamped Steel
Cost - $95
Distance from pin position(s) to fulcrum ?
Claimed reduction in S2S ??

*note – The supplied pin diameters for the Forge S2S lever are believed to be the same as for the F2B lever. While the small pin will work with OEM cable end bushings, if you choose to use aftermarket bushings you may encounter a problem as the OEM pin on the relay lever is 8mm whereas the Forge pin is 8.5mm.




Another visual of Forge’s OEM interpretation
. Clearly you can see it is an OEM piece that was modified.




I believe this to be a Forge Relay lever (top), compared to an early (MKIV?) relay lever (notice this OEM? Lever (bottom) is longer from pin to fulcrum. (it could also be home made, I can’t be 100% sure)




OEM (Plastic) Relay lever on MY2008 and up. Some 2007’s may have as well. They just don’t make things like they used to..



Now here is a different take on the same concept – the DieselGeek. The biggest difference is the slide (compared here to an OEM plastic relay lever, cable ends attached to both)




Another comparison of the entire shift unit – to the left from a Golf R, to the Right is DG S6




TWM assembly complete with their own relay lever







Here are a few others.



VWR SS assembly with what appears to be an unmodified metal OEM Relay lever




Again EPITuning. Not sure the specs on their relay lever but it could in fact be shorter, similar concept to OEM




DG Sigma6 in situ




Hope you have enjoyed, and thanks to those who I borrowed pics from! I’ll be slowly updating and revising this as info is presented. And by all means if there is anything else you want to see covered wrt this topic please let me know and I’ll try to include it!
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Old 02-27-2013, 10:11 AM   #3
SK VeeDubR
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02M Bushing Options

02M Bushing Options


Now we’re really getting into the nitty gritty. The often overlooked, unsung heros of the shifting world. OEM bushings have a lot of ‘play’ in them (Enthusiasts refer to this as ‘slop’). OEM Bushings are predominantly a soft rubber with an inner sleeve. It is this soft rubber which allows for forgiveness, play, and a less-connected feel. Great for your mom but not so good for you (actually, I don’t know your mom, maybe she likes things firm?).
While modifying your shift bushings will not make your F2B or S2S any shorter, by firming things up it might actually feel a bit shorter and more precise or engaged.



Shifter End Link Bushings


The only end link bushing options I am currently familiar with are the offerings from 42nd Draft Designs (42DD). 42DD offers a variety of kits for all the variations one might encounter in their 02M 6-speed transmission
CNC machined sleeved with an oil-impregnated bronze bearing (not all have this bearing based on application)
Cost - $35 to $45

Manufacturer’s statement: Our CNC machined shifter cable bushings tighten up the movement of your shifter cables, literally connecting your hand to the gears. In a performance situation, the factory rubber bushings flex causing a delay in the engagement in the gears.

Our bushings eliminate this delay and provide a precision shift free of slop or hesitation. Our shifter cable bushings are CNC machined from 6061 aluminum and fit precisely within the factory endlink. Each bushing is sleeved with an oil-impregnated bronze bearing. This bearing provides constant lubrication and a lifetime of use without wear.



This kit from 42DD is for MY07 6-speed




42DD (left), OEM (right)





Side profile OEM vs 42DD




‘Sloppy’ OEM





Notes:

as 42DD machines to very exact tolerances, their specific sets work with OEM shifters and relay levers. Older OEM shifter pins were 10mm, newer pins are 8.5mm. This is why most aftermarket short shifters ship with two pin sizes (8.5 and 10mm, easier than casting or machining two separate styles).



When we start modifying our shift levers we can potentially run into some frustration. For example, Forge has their version of the relay lever, which is basically an OEM piece that has the original pin sheared off and a slot cut out which allows their supplied pin to be positioned very specifically. People have found it difficult or impossible to use the Forge S2S with the 42DD bushings without at least some modification to one or both pieces. The problem here I believe is that the OEM pin on the metal relay lever is only 8mm. Forge most likely is including both 8.5 and 10mm pins as this is what they have. The 8.5 pin does not pose as much of a problem on the OEM bushing as the OEM bushings have a tiny bit of play between the core and the pin. Using an 8.5mm pin on an OE bushing probably feels better as it tightens up this tolerance.

The real problem though is trying to put an 8.5mm pin through an 8mm hole. People have had to resort to sanding down the pin to get it to fit, or less desirably have been filing down the inside of the bushing to get everything to fit. If you sand the pin, try to do so evenly and smoothly so as to avoid premature wear on the bushing, otherwise it does in fact look as though if one is using a Forge relay lever, they will have to sand the pin.

One final option is to use the 10mm pin, and a 42DD bushing with a 10mm hole (make sure it's the brass impregnated one, not the one for the plastic pin on the later MKV's and up.

Another problem 42DD has had to overcome was when VW in their infinite wisdom decided to switch from a metal to a plastic S2S. You can well imagine the plastic piece will not hold up over time compared to the metal piece, but if you want to save some money you can still use the plastic piece if you modify and reinforce it (kit supplied by 42DD)

Alternatively you can replace your plastic S2S with an earlier metal version so you can run proper bushings on a proper pin as opposed to a plastic one.
Some earlier MKIV’s had pivot balls as opposed to pins, these bearings WILL NOT work if this is what you have. You’re probably best off to upgrade to the later style levers with pins anyways.

There are quite a few possibilities if we start to consider mixing and matching OEM, aftermarket, cable ends, bushings etc. At the end of the day, do your homework. Keep in mind there are several ways to skin this cat.

Now keep in mind, if you decide to run a SS unit like the DieselGeek Sigma6, you will not require these shifter cable bushings. DG endlinks are already solid, remember?





Shift Bracket Bushings


Here is another place people sometimes skip modifying. Sure it’s cramped in there to get at the shift bracket, but many will attest to the benefits of upgrading these bushings as well.


TyrolSport Solid Shift Bracket Bushings (SSBB)

Brass, machined
Cost - $50




TyrolSport vs OEM rubber bushings




Force Fed Engineering
Stainless Steel, machined
Cost - $40





Verdict Motorsports

6061 Aluminum, machined
Cost - $25

Earlier version, Verdict Motorsports (not Powdercoated)




Powdercoated, Verdict Motorsports




Integrated Engineering

6061 Aluminum, Machined, black anodized
Cost - $30 USD





Independent?


Aluminum? Machined
Cost - $20 ?





Torque Solutions Shift Bracket Bushings


Material - Delrin Polymer (claims to bridge the gap between plastic OEM and metal aftermarket bushings)
Cost - $35 USD






I do want to point out that somewhere along the line (perhaps MY07) VW switched from a metal shift bracket to a plastic one. While replacing the plastic one with the earlier metal one can be done, is it really worth the trouble and cost?


OEM Metal Shift Bracket with Force Fed Engineering solid bushings







TyrolSport with metal Shift Bracket




OEM Plastic Shift Bracket with what looks to be Tyrol Sport Solid Bushings





And an honorable mention goes to HPA’s Dogbone Mount
. Even though this isn’t directly related to the shifting mechanisms of the car, people often report that with this modification they feel better connected to the car including the shifter.

Combination Urethane and machined 6061 aluminum
Cost - $190
Available in 75a, 80a, 85a, 90a


This is the 75a durometer is recommended for the Golf R




Comparison between HPA 90a and OEM



Hope you have enjoyed, and thanks to those I borrowed pics from! I’ll be slowly updating and revising this as info is presented. And by all means if there is anything else you want to see covered wrt this topic please let me know and I’ll try to include it!
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Old 02-27-2013, 10:36 AM   #4
barische
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U should add my windoweld fill to shifter endlinks bushing option
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Old 02-27-2013, 10:38 AM   #5
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Holy crap this is comprehensive. Thanks for taking the time to do this. I am saving this for future reference. I'll have to take some time to really study this. I had no idea there were this many options.
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Old 02-27-2013, 10:45 AM   #6
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Kind of a waste of time...the Dieselgeek is the best shifter
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Old 02-27-2013, 10:48 AM   #7
SK VeeDubR
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GreasyGinzo View Post
Kind of a waste of time...the Dieselgeek is the best shifter
opinions are like a$$holes..

Quote:
Originally Posted by barische View Post
U should add my windoweld fill to shifter endlinks bushing option
Oh yes I recall this now.. pm me a link to where you discuss this and I'll add it. Thanks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by lilfleck View Post
Holy crap this is comprehensive. Thanks for taking the time to do this. I am saving this for future reference. I'll have to take some time to really study this. I had no idea there were this many options.
Haha no worries! I started gathering the info for personal reference as I research everything to death (researcher in me I guess). Thought one area where everything is covered regarding this topic would be beneficial.

Last edited by SK VeeDubR; 02-27-2013 at 11:58 AM.
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Old 02-27-2013, 10:50 AM   #8
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Damn, nice work.

Bookmarking this for later reading.
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Old 02-27-2013, 10:51 AM   #9
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this was a great read, i have the OEM s3 SS and i plan on getting mounts & all the shifter bushings
can't wait to have a nice tight shifter feel, racecar FTW
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Old 02-27-2013, 11:04 AM   #10
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This should be renamed and stickied. Thanks for the hard work.
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Old 02-27-2013, 11:05 AM   #11
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The Dieselgeek Sigma Six is the absolute best on the market. I know I rant about how good the DG is every time someone asks, but it's for a reason. It was probably the most fun mod that I've done to my car out of them all
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Old 02-27-2013, 11:14 AM   #12
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Does anyone have a video of these shifters in action? I would like to see. Even though feel would be best... I feel like i've seen a DG video, but can't find it.
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Old 02-27-2013, 11:20 AM   #13
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I'm a huge fan of vf engineering mated with 42dd bushings and stock side by side. Feels very "OEM" but very sporty at the same time. No slop, no missing gears, just perfect.

I find I like the spacing of the stock side by side mated with shorter throws.
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Old 02-27-2013, 11:24 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lilfleck View Post
Does anyone have a video of these shifters in action? I would like to see. Even though feel would be best... I feel like i've seen a DG video, but can't find it.
I believe there are a few on youtube, I believe myturbodiesel.com made a video of the install and showing shift feel too. A few others i watched on youtube also.
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