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Vacuum Pump Blockoff Plate

KollinWithaK

Autocross Champion
So whats the consensus on the vacuum block off plate? Searched around on here and found people going either way, including say manual was easier to do the mod on vs automatic, whether or not it actually does anything, etc. The one person I've actually talked to about it says it made a difference on his DSG swapped 2.5; "the brake vacuum pump on our cars steals power and leaks oil pretty often."

I've not had issues with my pump yet (AT '13 with just a muffler and resonator delete for performance), but it seems like it would be good preventative maintenance while also freeing up some power, no?

Looking to buy my next wave of parts for the car and this was on the list, till I started reading some opinions on it.
 
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MLue1

Drag Race Newbie
So whats the consensus on the vacuum block off plate? Searched around on here and found people going either way, including say manual was easier to do the mod on vs automatic, whether or not it actually does anything, etc. The one person I've actually talked to about it says it made a difference on his DSG swapped 2.5; "the brake vacuum pump on our cars steals power and leaks oil pretty often."

I've not had issues with my pump yet (AT '13 with just a muffler and resonator delete for performance), but it seems like it would be good preventative maintenance while also freeing up some power, no?

Looking to buy my next wave of parts for the car and this was on the list, till I started reading some opinions on it.
Wascally Wabbit did a great write up on this part, as he does with all his write ups he thoughtfully argues both sides. Do a search for it.

I have experienced brake failure while driving and would never condone removing a part from the braking system that the manufacturer added. If the part breaks I will fix it, not remove it.

Just my 2 cents.
 

KollinWithaK

Autocross Champion
Do you mean this post here? That's where I got most of the information from. My train of thought is that if the pump itself is prone to leaking, and that similar systems pull pump from the intake manifold, why not use the kit for preventative maintenance and free up whatever minimal power is there?

I can also understand not removing something from as important as the brake system. Just curious as to whether or not this is really worth it. Still stuck in the middle.
 

Wascally Wabbit1

Go Kart Newbie
Do you mean this post here? That's where I got most of the information from. My train of thought is that if the pump itself is prone to leaking, and that similar systems pull pump from the intake manifold, why not use the kit for preventative maintenance and free up whatever minimal power is there?

I can also understand not removing something from as important as the brake system. Just curious as to whether or not this is really worth it. Still stuck in the middle.

Yes that post. I went back and forth on this but living in California the smog aspect was a deal breaker. Otherwise if it were me and smog wasn't an issue I would likely still leave it alone and reconsider if the pump ever failed or started leaking badly. The gains from removing it are very slim from what I heard from people who have done it. The real benefit is simplifying the setup by removing a piece of equipment that is not really necessary and going a more traditional route to provide vacumum to the brakes.

Funny enough mine has started to leak very slightly.
 

KollinWithaK

Autocross Champion
Ah gotcha. No smog here in Florida, so we can full send everything about our cars down here and no one cares.

I would likely still leave it alone and reconsider if the pump ever failed or started leaking badly. The gains from removing it are very slim from what I heard from people who have done it.

Funny enough mine has started to leak very slightly.

This is exactly whats pushing me to do it. I see it more as preventative than power. Would in theory save me the $300 part, and $1000+ in labor if mine ever failed.
 

Wascally Wabbit1

Go Kart Newbie
Ah gotcha. No smog here in Florida, so we can full send everything about our cars down here and no one cares.



This is exactly whats pushing me to do it. I see it more as preventative than power. Would in theory save me the $300 part, and $1000+ in labor if mine ever failed.


If I was in Florida and it started leaking it would be outa there never to return. I think I put a video in the other thread for replacing it and I recall it was kind of a pain in the ass.
 

MLue1

Drag Race Newbie
...The gains from removing it are very slim from what I heard from people who have done it...
Since this is a MAP system re-configuring the vacuum, may shift the vacuum affected parameters around a bit, hence you may feel that there is a change but I can't see it creating any additional power. :confused:
 

Wascally Wabbit1

Go Kart Newbie
Since this is a MAP system re-configuring the vacuum, may shift the vacuum affected parameters around a bit, hence you may feel that there is a change but I can't see it creating any additional power. :confused:

Not designed to create power but reduce "parasitic engine drag" essentially freeing up power, which I think is a stretch at best. I think "gains" was a poor choice of words on my part, I was meaning benefits. The guy I got my intake from had removed his vacuum pump and he said it made the car idle smoother but that was about it. Essentially the main advantage is not having to shell out $300 for a new pump when it starts leaking.
 

FlowMK6

Ready to race!
There is no noticeable performance advantage of deleting the vacuum pump. The part has tendancy to leak, deleting the pump avoid future leaking from that part. Most gasoline cars doesn't have a vacuum pump, because it's not needed and it's just an extra part that can broke, on a diesel engine it's useful since there is no vaccum, it needs a pump to supply vacuum

On a gasoline engine, because of the throttle, there is vacuum on the intake manifold except if you go WOT, this means you have plenty of vaccum when you're idling and crusing, as far as I know, we release the accelerator when breaking, you won't notice any difference on the brake pedal feel after the installation, it's a good preventive maintenance and I mostly think it's harder to do on a automatic because of the shifter linkage which doesn't give enough clearance to remove the pump, I did it on rabbit and a golf, both manual,it's pretty easy and straightforward, I prefer to remove the battery tray to give more space

I would also recommend the Integrated engineering delete plate, cheaper and the design is way better, cleaner and seems to hold oil pressure better, as for the hose, get a 3/8" vacuum hose that goes from the brake booster to the vacuum port on the throttle body
 

MLue1

Drag Race Newbie
There is no noticeable performance advantage of deleting the vacuum pump. The part has tendancy to leak, deleting the pump avoid future leaking from that part. Most gasoline cars doesn't have a vacuum pump, because it's not needed and it's just an extra part that can broke, on a diesel engine it's useful since there is no vaccum, it needs a pump to supply vacuum

On a gasoline engine, because of the throttle, there is vacuum on the intake manifold except if you go WOT, this means you have plenty of vaccum when you're idling and crusing, as far as I know, we release the accelerator when breaking, you won't notice any difference on the brake pedal feel after the installation, it's a good preventive maintenance and I mostly think it's harder to do on a automatic because of the shifter linkage which doesn't give enough clearance to remove the pump, I did it on rabbit and a golf, both manual,it's pretty easy and straightforward, I prefer to remove the battery tray to give more space

I would also recommend the Integrated engineering delete plate, cheaper and the design is way better, cleaner and seems to hold oil pressure better, as for the hose, get a 3/8" vacuum hose that goes from the brake booster to the vacuum port on the throttle body
Where I live, the Emissions Testing is a joke and will be discontinued on April 1st 2019 (thank god) but the Vehicle Safety Certification is still extremely strict (no thanks to the last Government), a License Mechanic is liable for removal of the vacuum pump. If a Used Car that came from the factory equipt with a vacuum pump, comes to a Licence Mechanic for certification without the vacuum pump install. If the Mechanic certifies the car in question without reinstalling a vacuum pump on the car, he puts himself at risk for the length of time the certification last.
 
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