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Vacuum pump delete

Wascally Wabbit1

Go Kart Newbie
I've looked around but all I find is sales propoganda. I have the vacuum port from the manifold free and it looks easy enough so I was considering it.

Curious if it's worth my time. Thoughts?
 
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1ashchuckton

Autocross Champion
My take is I wouldn't do it. The reason being is that your brakes will require a very hard push to stop the car.

The vacuum hose collapsed on my GTI. It was undriveble, the brake pedal had to be pushed with all my might. That vacuum brake booster is needed to have the brakes work correctly.
 
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MLue1

Drag Race Newbie
My take is I wouldn't do it. The reason being is that your brakes will require a very hard push to stop the car.

The vacuum hose collapsed on my GTI. It was undriveble, the brake pedal had to be pushed with all my might. That vacuum brake booster is need to have the brakes work correctly.
We talking about two different engines in the MK6 but I agree I wouldn't do it.

Spullen sells these things to guys but I don't agree getting rid of a part that the manufacturer deems important enough to install it on their car. Example the braking issue that 1ashchuckton points out is enough for me. Plus the performance of the engines are always based on vacuum levels, so why do you want to change the fundamentals. The ECU is always reading vacuum levels directly or indirectly, the MAP sensor is actually part of that system, that can affect engine power if it isn't reading correctly because you're shunting the vacuum levels.....just saying.

Your car, do what makes you happy.
 
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Wascally Wabbit1

Go Kart Newbie
I am not taliking about just removing it but removing it and running vacuum off the intake manifold. My car is already stripped of the vacuum system from the pcv and the only thing currently under vacuum are the crankcase and brakes. The vacuum pumps sole purpose is to supply vacuum to the brakes. Traditionally brake boosters are run off the intake manifold but in the 2.5L for some reason they run a vacuum pump. The guy I bought my manifold from was running his brake booster off the mainofold.

Edit: talked to the guy I got the i take from and he said he never had an issue. Brakes were a little firmer and idle a little smoother. Hmm. Gonna have to give it more thought.
 
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Dartregor

Ready to race!
I am not taliking about just removing it but removing it and running vacuum off the intake manifold. My car is already stripped of the vacuum system from the pcv and the only thing currently under vacuum are the crankcase and brakes. The vacuum pumps sole purpose is to supply vacuum to the brakes. Traditionally brake boosters are run off the intake manifold but in the 2.5L for some reason they run a vacuum pump. The guy I bought my manifold from was running his brake booster off the mainofold.

Edit: talked to the guy I got the i take from and he said he never had an issue. Brakes were a little firmer and idle a little smoother. Hmm. Gonna have to give it more thought.



Id say try it and let us know how it goes. If not just put stock pump back in done deal.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

MLue1

Drag Race Newbie
I am not taliking about just removing it but removing it and running vacuum off the intake manifold. My car is already stripped of the vacuum system from the pcv and the only thing currently under vacuum are the crankcase and brakes. The vacuum pumps sole purpose is to supply vacuum to the brakes. Traditionally brake boosters are run off the intake manifold but in the 2.5L for some reason they run a vacuum pump. The guy I bought my manifold from was running his brake booster off the mainofold.

Edit: talked to the guy I got the i take from and he said he never had an issue. Brakes were a little firmer and idle a little smoother. Hmm. Gonna have to give it more thought.
I never gave the vacuum pump much though, so doing some research found the info below.

The Video below covers how the vacumn pump fail. BUT there is a statement in the Part Description "....This parts function is to be sure that the systems that require vacuum have them even when engine vacuum is not available." I take it that they are talking specifically to the brakes, personally I would replace it or try resealing the vacuum pump. I've blown engines, should this happen Anywhere I'd like to know that I can stop the car safely.

https://www.shopdap.com/catalog/pro...07k145100h-vw-2-5-vacuum-pump/category/11624/

Removal and Replace Instructions.
https://youtu.be/TvMWRCR7y_E

It's your car, do what makes you happy.

Cheers !
 

Wascally Wabbit1

Go Kart Newbie
I never gave the vacuum pump much though, so doing some research found the info below.

The Video below covers how the vacumn pump fail. BUT there is a statement in the Part Description "....This parts function is to be sure that the systems that require vacuum have them even when engine vacuum is not available." I take it that they are talking specifically to the brakes, personally I would replace it or try resealing the vacuum pump. I've blown engines, should this happen Anywhere I'd like to know that I can stop the car safely.

This is a good point. However most cars do not use a vacuum pump and removing it and running vacuum from the manifold is the traditional approach (ie how most cars are setup). Also the vacuum pump is mechanical so I would imagine when the motor stops so does the pump so the results would be the same. I am really not sure why VW chose to add this onto the 2.5L. My guess is to make the brakes feel softer and/or safety in the event of a vacuum leak in the manifold. Or maybe due to our favorite issue of oil in the vacuum system from the PCV.

Removal and Replace Instructions.
https://youtu.be/TvMWRCR7y_E

This video is for an automatic. Way different removal than a manual. On the automatic the tranny is in the way and it is a much harder job. The manual is infinitely easier as the tranny is not blocking the pump.
 
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MLue1

Drag Race Newbie
I understand that how it was done for most cars but the Germans simply don't add a $300 part for no reason on both MK5s and MK6s.

I get that mods are for performance reasons, so it's easy to explain in that context; BUT in all fairness how well would it go over, if you got in an accident and someone found out that the standard equipment vacuum pump was removed.

:23:
 

Wascally Wabbit1

Go Kart Newbie
Agreed. Please don't think I am defending the practice or trying to start a debate. I was simply trying to understand A) what's the point of this mod, which led to B) what's the point of the Vacuum pump? Then it seemed the point of the mod was there was no point to the pump.

I need to add that I have to put my car back to stock every 2 years for the smog inspection and deleting the vacuum pump will not pass smog here in California because in order to run it with the pcv still installed you have to alter the hose conecting the pcv to the manifold. Automatic fail. So for me I would have to reinstall the pump which adds another task to the process.

I finally found an answer to what the pump's purpose is and that is to provide consistent vacuum to the brakes regardless of engine load. Well that makes sense I guess except that vacuum increase as the plate on the TB closes and is highest when closed (basically when your foot is not on the gas). Well if your foot is on the brake it best not be on the gas so the brakes should have more than enough vacuum when you need it. Shouldn't matter how much vacuum they have when you're on the gas especially considering the brakes still hold some vacuum due to the check valve on the booster. This is why your brakes don't get stiff right away when your engine dies. I think to MLue's point above that it is more likely a safety feature so that if manifold vacuum is lost your brakes still work.

I believe I have also found why this mod is available and it is not likely to help free up space in your engine bay like the sales marketing team at IE and Spulen will lead you to believe. Not sure what they were smoking when they came up with that as a benefit. Sweet now I can free up that tuna can sized area of unuseable space down by the trans...sold! Removing the pump may take some load off the engine but it's likely negligeable. I believe the real reason is simply that the pump is prone to failure and when it does it leaks a lot of oil (often mistaken for a rear main seal leak). And as MLue stated above it's a $300 part and if you have an automatic trans the mechanic is going to want to pull the trans to replace it. I have heard estimates on the forums pushing $1400 to replace this pump. With a repair cost that high a $65 IE part or $120 Spulen kit starts to look pretty good especially if you don't really NEED the pump in the first place. My final word on this is that the covers used to delete the vacuum pump also seem to be prone to leaking. I have read that complaint of both the Spulen and IE cover.
 
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Wascally Wabbit1

Go Kart Newbie
No. I can't because I'm in California and to delete the pump you have to tee into the PCV line which in California would not pass smog inspection. I've heard the IE one is the one to go with. My pump is also leaking slightly I believe.
 

jay745

track sl00t
No. I can't because I'm in California and to delete the pump you have to tee into the PCV line which in California would not pass smog inspection. I've heard the IE one is the one to go with. My pump is also leaking slightly I believe.

Can you elaborate on that? I looked over the install and didn't see anything about tapping into the pcv with the IE delete plate. Doesn't really matter either way, just want to be prepared when I install it.
 

Wascally Wabbit1

Go Kart Newbie
You need a strong enough vacuum source to run the brakes still so if you are running the stock intake manifold the best (only really) source is the PCV hose. The spullen kit comes with a new PCV hose that tees another line in for the brakes. If you are running a different intake like IE's best to run it off one of the 1/8" vacuum ports on the intake manifold.

I am not sure about IE's instructions but my bet is they're assuming you are running vacuum to the brakes from their intake manifold.
 
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jay745

track sl00t
You need a strong enough vacuum source to run the brakes still so if you are running the stock intake manifold the best (only really) source is the PCV hose. The spullen comes with a new PCV hose that tees another line in for the brakes. If you are running a different intake like IE's best to run it off one off the 1/8" vacuum ports on the intake manifold.

I am not sure about IE's instructions but my bet is they're assuming you are running vacuum to the brakes from their intake manifold.

Interesting. First I'm hearing of that, guess I'll have to research a bit more on it.
 

Wascally Wabbit1

Go Kart Newbie
Look at the install for the spullen kit.

The guy I got the IE intake manifold from had IE's delete plate and was running vacuum of the port for the brakes. I would be doing the same if I lived in a different state. Really the vacuum pumps sole purpose is to apply independent vacuum to the brakes. If you remove the pump that vacuum has to come from somewhere else. Most cars run it off the PCV system I believe.
 
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