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Old 11-10-2010, 03:38 PM   #15
xCybe
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If I'm not mistaken, ECS is offering DWS on Interlagos (they've been calling my name)

Maybe the bundle would be a nice way to go. Also, it looks like the interlagos may offer some mild brake-cooling effect, like SLR wheels.
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Old 11-10-2010, 03:56 PM   #16
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Again, Bender, sage.

Not only do you have the same taste in GTI's, candy white, 17", 4 door (I presume MT), as I, but it appears you have the same taste in roads, as well as engineering prudence.

Subscribed.

Please keep us in the loop regarding your brake/tire updates (modifications that I am interested in, as I, too, am satisfied with stock power and have little interest in suspension mods.) Also, please keep us in the loop regarding the intercooler. As I live in the south, the 100+ degree days played a large role in my previous ride's slide into oblivion, so I am keenly interested in any thermal accessories.
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Old 11-10-2010, 04:07 PM   #17
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Subscribed. I also find these brakes to be very weak, but I had no idea changing the fluid or lines can make a difference. I learn something new everyday
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Old 11-10-2010, 04:22 PM   #18
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I still have a can of ATE blue left from my last GTI or WRX I think. Can't really remember what i used it on. Do I really think fluid alone is going to change my pedal feel under normal street driving style? No. But steel lines certainly will.
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Old 11-10-2010, 05:53 PM   #19
bozaman
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bender, a hat tip to you.

it's nice to see a measured and thoughtful approach to mods that make a difference for what you want/need out of the car rather than the seemingly haphazard approach many others take.

personally, i agree with your approach to mods here, and like you i'm on the fence with the catch-can. the brakes and tires, however - spot on. a tune? nice, but not necessary and if it happens it is likely to happen at some random point in time (impulse buy?).

i'll watch this build-out with interest. cheers.
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upgrades: revo s2, k&n filter, awe dp, magnaflow cbe, fifteen52 rml snowflakes, michelin pilot super sport (225/40-18), usp ss lines, stop-tech slotted rotors, hawk hps pads, piaa plasma yellow fogs, 9w7 bt module, others coming soon...
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Old 11-10-2010, 05:57 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bozaman View Post
bender, a hat tip to you.

it's nice to see a measured and thoughtful approach to mods that make a difference for what you want/need out of the car rather than the seemingly haphazard approach many others take.

personally, i agree with your approach to mods here, and like you i'm on the fence with the catch-can. the brakes and tires, however - spot on. a tune? nice, but not necessary and if it happens it is likely to happen at some random point in time (impulse buy?).

i'll watch this build-out with interest. cheers.
I would say a tune is necessary.. to me at least. It just makes the car so freaking fun to drive, it's how it sould come from stock. If in the future I switch cars and get another turboed, that's definitely the first thing I'm doing to it.
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Old 11-10-2010, 09:38 PM   #21
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Couple additions to the list that I totally forgot about:

DieselGeek Sigma6

Blindspot mirrors

Above I mentioned that USP listed stainless steel clutch lines as an add on with the Brake Lines. I know little about stainless steel clutch lines but one of my buddies came across this post on one of the Mazda boards:

Quote:
This is one mod in which at least one positive benefit was immediately apparent and easily identifiable. Driving the car for the first time after the line change, the clutch pedal required noticeably more force to depress - the effect was quite pronounced - not at all subtle. This suggests that indeed the OEM line was undergoing volumetric expansion in which some of the hydraulic pressure was being wasted in expanding the line instead of its full force being directed to clutch disengagement. Whether the OEM line was always like this due to its rubber construction, or developed this tendency over time, I really can't say as naturally it's impossible for me to recall clutch pedal feel eight years ago when the car was new.

As someone who has only owned M/T cars throughout my lifetime (so far), I'm pretty good at clutching, double clutching, shifting and coordinating the movements needed to produce smooth take offs and shifts whether starting on an upgrade, a downgrade, or moving out fast or slow either on wet or dry surfaces, as you might expect from long experience alone. In connection with this, a second advantage I found with the new line is that there now seems to be a more direct connection between pedal movement and clutch operation leading to an ability to regulate the clutch more precisely over varying driving requirements.

There have been times when engaging in fast shifting, and I would slam the clutch pedal down and move the stick rapidly into the next gear, that I'd get resistance (along with an audible clunk) from the synchros. I usually attributed this to my failure to fully disengage the clutch before calling on the synchros to act. I'm now considering the idea that although I depressed the clutch pedal to its limit of travel, the tendency for the fluid to expand the line may have lengthened the amount of time required for the full hydraulic force to be applied to the clutch release lever, thus preventing the clutch from being fully released before the stick was moved. If this analysis is correct, the new stainless steel line should provide an additional benefit in enabling faster, smoother shifts without stressing the synchros.

To put this idea to the test, I deliberately carried out some fast shifting to try to provoke the synchros. Although the shifting went smoothly, the tests were hardly conclusive in that even when the OEM rubber line was in place fast shifting didn't always cause problems. Obviously, more testing will be required on my part, beyond the limited time I had available for this first road test, before I can come to any conclusion. I'll certainly keep you posted as I acquire more experience in this area.

One additional area I'd like to investigate is whether clutch operation will be improved in stop and start and slow speed driving. I would anticipate that with the ability to regulate clutch action more precisely, this kind of driving may prove to be less of a chore. When I have the misfortune to be caught in the next traffic jam, you can be sure I'll report back to you.

Conclusion
So far I like the improved feel of the clutch and consider this mod very worthwhile. I expect my overall satisfaction will increase over time as I come to experience the full range of benefits from the change. Also to be considered is the disaster prevention value in replacing an 8-year old hydraulic line. The price certainly seems right considering the relatively moderate cost of the line and some brake fluid.

Happy Motoring!
Interesting theories... will have to ponder this one a bit...
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Old 11-11-2010, 10:40 AM   #22
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I am (relatively) new to all of this, and I'm really trying to figure it all out, but cars are very complex. I thought when I read your initial post that you wanted steel lines for the breaks, but the Mazda post is about the clutch. Can you explain what the steel break lines would do for you? What exactly do the break lines do? Sorry to be a thorn. I am also trying to put as much thought into the mods I do to this car; I think it's great stock. Also, I've read about the catch cans, and it seems like they would be a good investment. Why are you on the fence about the catch can? Are there any negatives?
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Old 11-11-2010, 10:47 AM   #23
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Happy to answer some questions:

I was originally talking about stainless steel brake lines - those are a definite.
I brought up the clutch lines because they are offered and I was curious about them.

Both brakes and clutch are actuated by hydraulic fluid (brake fluid in both cases. You press the pedal, fluid moves, and either engages the clutch or the brakes.

The issue is that these fluids are under EXTREMELY high pressure (i have heard numbers in excess of 3000 psi, but i don't know if that is true). The result is the tubes they run in can flex, causing a spongy pedal and reducing braking distance.

Getting stainless steel brake lines (which are actually teflon lines wrapped in steel braiding) keeps them from flexing under pressure and provides better brake response.

I am just learning about stainless clutch lines myself, but in theory engagement should be crisper.



I found this great write up of what a catch can does:
Quote:
An oil catch can is used in turbo applications, or high-performance race applications where excessive blow-by (leakage past the piston rings) of air and fuel vapor occurs. This creates a positive pressure in the crankcase. Engine manufactures have placed a valve on the engine block which releases this pressure. This valve is known as a PCV (Positive Crankcase Ventilation) valve. During engine operation, blow-by gases, as well as oil mist from the rotating components of the engine, pass through the PCV valve and are routed back into the intake for the engine to burn off. However, some of the oil mist and other products settle along the engine intake and over time form a "gunk." The oil catch can collects the oil mist and condenses the fuel vapors while allowing "cleaner" gases to be passed back into the intake. Typically the blow-by gasses are passed through a wire mesh, which give the vapor droplets something to adhere to. Since the oil catch cans condense the vapor portion of the gasses, they will need to be drained periodically of all the oil, fuel and other contaminants.
In a typical engine this isn't an issue because they will land on the valves which can be cleaned with fuel injector cleaner. In a Direct Injection car like ours, there is no way to clean them off and they can build up.
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Old 11-11-2010, 10:50 AM   #24
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Brake lines are rubber. When the brakes undergo heavy use, the brake fluid heats and hot fluid through rubber lines causes rubber the lines to expand which leads to fading, pressure loss and a "mushy" brake pedal feel.

Stainless steel lines will not expand so brake pressure is not lost when the brake fluid becomes hot.

This event mostly occurs in situations where there is aggressive brake use such as tracking or on spirited drives. The average joe commuting in their GTIs will rarely experience this situation.
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Old 11-11-2010, 07:06 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bender View Post
I was originally talking about stainless steel brake lines - those are a definite.
Other than cost, is there any downside whatsoever from installing stainless steel brake lines?

Or is that change all upside?

Dave, who likes the idea of simple direct improvements
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Old 11-11-2010, 07:51 PM   #26
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Only downside is that Stainless Steel does degrade over time. They need replacement in 5 years or so.

That said, in theory the area can easily be inspected anytime you are rotating the tires so there is little chance of missing an issue.
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Old 11-11-2010, 10:51 PM   #27
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Nice alliteration haha.
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Old 11-12-2010, 02:38 PM   #28
bozaman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bender View Post
Only downside is that Stainless Steel does degrade over time. They need replacement in 5 years or so.

That said, in theory the area can easily be inspected anytime you are rotating the tires so there is little chance of missing an issue.
i've never completed a ss upgrade on any vehicle, and this is the first time i've heard of a 5-year service life for ss lines. can you elaborate on what drives the deterioration?
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upgrades: revo s2, k&n filter, awe dp, magnaflow cbe, fifteen52 rml snowflakes, michelin pilot super sport (225/40-18), usp ss lines, stop-tech slotted rotors, hawk hps pads, piaa plasma yellow fogs, 9w7 bt module, others coming soon...
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